Grassroots Commentary

Let's Speak Plainly

By Paige Cashion · Jan. 16, 2013

What is at the heart of the gun debate, or should be, is whether or not you believe there may ever come a time that we the people might need to form a ‘militia’ of our own, separate from our US military, to protect ourselves and our families from an American government gone awry, or a foreign invading force. The founders of our nation felt the possibility existed and gave us the gift of the 2nd Amendment.



If that scenario is possible, anywhere in our future or the future of our children (and history of civilization/governments seems to warn that it is) do you want to face, or your children to face, a government army or an invading foreign force with just a pistol and a hunting rifle?



The Second Amendment was not written to protect our right to go hunting on the flippin' weekend or our right to fight off rapists and robbers. We have changed as a nation, yes, but humankind has not changed and evil, and evil men in search of power, still exist in this world.

Let’s speak plainly. The 2nd Amendment was written so we could do exactly what they, its authors, were doing – revolt against a tyrannical government, foreign or domestic. Are you ready to take that right away from your children and your children’s children? I, for one, am not.



But then, my great, great, great, great grandfather, Asa Hill, died after two years in one of Santa Anna’s prisons to give me that right, and his son, Isaac, fought at San Jacinto to give me that right, and another of them, John Christopher Columbus Hill, served as translator between the U.S. officials and Mexican officials as they negotiated the Treaty of Hidalgo, which ceded Texas, New Mexico, Arizona etc., to the U.S., to give me that right. So, maybe I’m just biased… and the framers of the Constitution, just paranoid.

Go ahead. Give that right away.

“If cowardly and dishonorable men sometimes shoot unarmed men with army pistols or guns, the evil must be prevented by the penitentiary and gallows, and not by a general deprivation of a constitutional privilege.” –Arkansas Supreme Court, 1878