Right Hooks

Slippery Slope? What's Next After Same-Sex Marriage

Dan Gilmore · Jul. 2, 2015

The boundaries are already being pushed on the new definition of marriage handed down from the Supreme Court last week. On June 30, Nathan Collier went down to his county courthouse in Montana to apply for a marriage license for his second wife. Collier, who was featured on the reality TV show “Sister Wives,” is legally married to his wife Victoria, but said he married his second wife Christine through a religious wedding ceremony. Collier was excommunicated from the Mormon Church for practicing polygamy. Because the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage, Collier wants to use the same arguments to justify the practice. “We’re not even asking for acceptance, we’re just asking for tolerance. Let us live our lives together without fear,” Collier said. “My second wife Christine, who I’m not legally married to, she’s put up with my crap for a lot of years. She deserves legitimacy.” And it’s not just polygamy. Sara Burrows is a libertarian who practices polyamory, or the practice of engaging in multiple, open romantic relationships. “I had freed myself from the grips of government, religion, and parents,” she wrote. “The only chains left to throw off were those on my sexuality — particularly the chains of monogamy.” Indeed, since SCOTUS redefined a thousand-year-old definition of marriage, what are the secular arguments against redefining the institution further?

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