Right Hooks

Two Women Graduate From Army Ranger Training

Is the nation ready to place women on the rolls of the Selective Service?

Dan Gilmore · Aug. 18, 2015
Soldiers in the Ranger program conduct training at Eglin Air Force Base Aug. 6

In an event that will intensify the discussion regarding the placement of women in military combat roles, Fort Benning Public Affairs announced that two women would be graduating from the elite U.S. Army Ranger Course. In April, 19 women and 381 men started Ranger school. Only 94 men and two women will graduate the program Aug. 21 that took the soldiers from the mountains of Georgia to the swamps of Florida. According to USA Today, the Pentagon sent the 19 female soldiers through the Ranger program to test the upcoming implementation of its policies mandating that every position in the military be open to any soldier regardless of gender. But the two female Ranger graduates are still prohibited from going into combat. “This course has proven that every Soldier, regardless of gender, can achieve his or her full potential,” said Army Secretary John M. McHugh. “We owe Soldiers the opportunity to serve successfully in any position where they are qualified and capable, and we continue to look for ways to select, train and retain the best Soldiers to meet our nation’s needs.” It’s part of the Obama administration’s policies pushing for “equality” on the battlefield. But as former Ranger Infantry Officer James Atticus Bowden writes, the sexual tension and realities of war would lessen the effectiveness of America’s military if women were to walk the front lines. Furthermore, this situation leaves an unanswered ethical question: Are we, as a nation, ready to place women on the rolls of the Selective Service?

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