Right Hooks

Obama's Denial Tour

He went to Europe to bash America and deflect blame.

Thomas Gallatin · Nov. 16, 2016

Among the first things Barack Obama did upon assuming office in 2009 was to embark on his infamous apology tour, visiting various world leaders to express his heartfelt sorrow for America’s failings. Now on his last foreign trip, billed as an attempt to reassure allies after Donald Trump’s election, Obama has revived his apologize-for-America rhetoric, while at the same time attempting to defend his own record. It’s as if Obama were saying to his leftist, globalist, elitist buddies, “It’s hard work attempting to rule those obstinate and ignorant rubes.”

In Greece, Obama declared, “We have to deal with people’s fears that their children won’t do as well as they have. The more aggressively and effectively we deal with those issues, the less those fears may channel themselves into counterproductive approaches that pit people against each other. And frankly, that’s been my agenda for the last eight years.” What a completely disingenuous statement given Obama’s incessant practice of “pitting people against each other.” Obama, the divider in chief, rarely let an opportunity go by to blame some group — whether it be the “gun lobby” or “racist cops” or those “do-nothing” Republicans or, his seemingly favorite target whenever referencing the poor economy or the problems in the Middle East, George W. Bush.

While seeking to protect his legacy and continue to promote his ideal of globalism, Obama also sought to warn the world against populist movements. He cautioned that people around the world “are going to have to guard against a rise in a crude sort of nationalism, or ethnic identity, or tribalism.” This too is ironic, as it was his administration that endlessly practiced identity politics based entirely on tribalism.

In one of Obama’s more narcissistic moments, he attempted to explain why Americans seem to like him but rejected so much of what he accomplished. He boasted, “People seem to think I did a pretty good job, and so there is this mismatch I think between frustration and anger. Perhaps the view of the American people is that you just need to shake things up.” In other words, he wasn’t the problem; Americans just don’t know what’s good for them. Maybe he forgot that he spent the entire campaign running around telling anyone who would listen that he wasn’t on the ballot but his policies were. Americans do know one thing: We don’t much like those in government dictating to us what we’re allowed to think and speak.

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