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Race

Bush Condemns Riots but Promotes Myth of Systemic Racism

He calls for unity by capitulating to the "social justice" dogma that America is a racist nation.

Thomas Gallatin · Jun. 3, 2020

George W. Bush released a statement calling for unity and racial justice while expressing solidarity with those currently protesting the unjust death of George Floyd while in police custody. However, rather than question the leftist “social justice” activists’ dubious narrative of “systemic racism” — a charge that has been repeatedly debunked by hard data and a variety of studies — Bush simply echoed the same narrative as Barack Obama. “It remains a shocking failure that many African Americans, especially young African American men, are harassed and threatened in their own country,” Bush lamented. “It is a strength when protesters, protected by responsible law enforcement, march for a better future. This tragedy — in a long series of similar tragedies — raises a long overdue question: How do we end systemic racism in our society?”

The former president added, “The only way to see ourselves in a true light is to listen to the voices of so many who are hurting and grieving. Those who set out to silence those voices do not understand the meaning of America — or how it becomes a better place.” In other words, anyone who dares question the “social justice” dogma of “systemic racism” is condemned as “part of the problem.” Feelings trump facts.

The only means to finding a genuine solution to any problem is to first accurately identify the problem. Unquestioningly accepting a narrative — in this case one that is itself based upon radical racial identitarianism — as the gospel truth will only lead to false solutions that may only exacerbate the genuine problem.

While Bush, like almost every American, is justifiably upset and angered by the callous, indifferent, and deadly actions taken by four Minneapolis police officers, that doesn’t excuse him or anyone else from propagating a false narrative. “Many doubt the justice of our country, and with good reason,” he asserts. “Black people see the repeated violation of their rights without an urgent and adequate response from American institutions.” Is that true? Is it only black Americans today who suffer repeated violations of their rights with no response from American institutions? Not according to the data. Do black Americans suffer repeated violations of their rights at a higher rate than other Americans? Again, not according to the data. Do black Americans feel their rights are violated more often than other Americans? Clearly many do, though thankfully not all, as there is a small but growing number of black Americans who reject this racist narrative — our own Patrick Hampton and Willie Richardson among them. But this subjectivity of feelings is being used as the primary “evidence” of “systemic racism.”

We’ll give Bush credit for speaking out against rioting and violence. “We know that lasting justice will only come by peaceful means. Looting is not liberation, and destruction is not progress,” he wrote. “But” — and there’s always a “but” — “we also know that lasting peace in our communities requires truly equal justice. The rule of law ultimately depends on the fairness and legitimacy of the legal system. And achieving justice for all is the duty of all.”

Recognizing that many people across the country are angry over a crime is understandable. Blaming wholly innocent people for somehow being a cause of the crime is unjust, and Bush should know better. After all, was he not falsely labeled a racist by many on the Left following Hurricane Katrina? Then again, maybe his own bitter experience is why he issued this statement.

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