Grassroots Commentary

Racism Fiction

Albert Maslar · May 28, 2014

Racism is a topic that just won’t quit, but is it a valid national concern in the 21st century? The short answer is there always has been racism that diminished over the decades only to erupt into a firestorm, perhaps intentionally instigated and enabled by half-Black President Barack Hussein Obama.

White support boosted the 14% black population into the forefront of history. Obama has no roots in slavery as he was born out of the Lower 48 contiguous United States, born into privilege off the mainland with the proverbial silver spoon in his mouth that he denies his fellow Blacks whom Obama relegates to welfare status in lieu of jobs.

Racism rearing its ugly head is an excuse that covers a multitude of contributing racial-slur sins that entrapped 80-year old Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, who uttered off-the-cuff racial remarks recorded by his young lady friend.

Allen West penned a commentary about the owner of the NBA Dallas Mavericks, Mark Cuban, one of few defending Sterling. Cuban related his experience of “Crossing the street to avoid a young black kid in a hoodie or a bald white male with tattoos all over his neck and face, showing his sense of fear for his personal security.”

Black Reverend Jesse Jackson Sr. admitted his similar experience twenty-years ago: “There is nothing more painful to me at this stage in my life than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery. Then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved… After all we have been through. Just to think we can’t walk down our own streets, how humiliating.”

There it is, encapsulated in a nutshell. Ethnic races, be they black or white, are fearful for their safety when someone wearing a hoodie or depicted as a tough hombre is coming up behind them. Obama narrated his experience of being offended when in his immediate proximity he heard the clicking of a car door locking. That protective action makes good sense, considering all the car-jackings and personal dangers possibly threatening, as these are even occurring at gas stations when drivers are already stopped to refill gas tanks.

What kind of culture does America live in when looking out for one’s safety is racism? Actually, differences in culture are wrongly perceived as racism. America is a multicultural country, and it is natural for each to hold to its own while possibly being fearful or in disregard or disrespect because of the differences that are appreciated by each culture that places itself above the others that seem to be out of tune with perceived reality.

Further examination of any culture reveals various subcultures and symbolism reflected in mannerisms, clothing, music, education, language, idioms, and other visible pretenses differentiating one subculture from its main body of cultural roots and interpretation by the dominant culture of their class.

Subcultures exist in virtually every organization, highlighting the fact that there are multiple cultures or value combinations that complement and compete with the main organizational culture. Subcultures are often reviled by their main culture that is bent on curtailing effects of their lower subcultures. Subcultures in the 21st century have been related to moral problems, particularly affecting youth whom main culture defines as troublemakers.

A surmised conclusion may be that in assessing any culture, the criteria might be similar to the Bell Curve concept used to grade students, in that the top and bottom segments are dismissed in order to ascertain the value that should be given to the majority of members in the particular culture.

This rationale gets back to point in that members of a given culture are often either embarrassed or fearful of lower members in their class. That puts the lie to accusations of racism when it is disparagement by outsiders and by its own class that lag behind the ideals and advancement of the upper members of the class.

Racism exists as it always has, but is declining except for those who stand to gain by politicizing the issue. Racism is painted with too broad a brush by the MSM and opposing upper classes, as well as prejudiced by members of other classes and cultures. Racism is a fiction which accusations are cannon fodder for destructive arguments by political and social opponents.

Racism is not the ultimate crime that is also being consigned to thought crime by government aficionados of political correctness, while real crime and transgressions receive the proverbial slap of the wrist. Thought crime is now a hate crime, and family members are encouraged to report transgressions by their own families. Nazi Germany must have had its genesis in this process, and the holocaust was the ultimate human hate crime and degradation.

It may be time to be less sensitive, and just ignore perceived racism and let it run off the back as does water, and live by the saying, “Sticks and stones may hurt my bones, but names will never hurt me.” Ignoring verbal slights is often the best response. Another way of ignoring perceived verbal slights is, “Call me anything, but don’t call me late for dinner.” Humor covers a multitude of sins, shrinks the problem of a broken limb to that of a mere splinter.

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