Mid-Day Digest

Dec. 3, 2018

THE FOUNDATION

“Let the American youth never forget, that they possess a noble inheritance, bought by the toils, and sufferings, and blood of their ancestors.” —Justice Joseph Story (1833)

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IN TODAY’S EDITION

IN BRIEF

George Herbert Walker Bush

Mark Alexander

George H.W. Bush, our nation’s 41st president, died in peace last Friday evening. He was 94.

He was the last of the “Greatest Generation” to serve our nation as president, having previously served two terms as Ronald Reagan’s vice president. He served our nation with dignity, distinction, and honor from the age of 18 as a World War II naval aviator to his final days as president in 1993.

In the photograph above, Bush’s veteran disability service dog, Sully, awaits the movement of his casket from Houston to Washington, DC, where he will lie in state in the U.S. Capitol until Wednesday. The moving photo was taken by his spokesman, Jim McGrath, who entitled it, “Mission complete.”

The president’s last words were to his son, President George W. Bush: “I love you, too.” His devoted son will offer his father’s eulogy on Wednesday at National Cathedral, where he will be joined in remarks by former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, former U.S. Sen. Alan Simpson, and his biographer, author Jon Meacham.

On Thursday, President Bush will return to Houston for a memorial service at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church and eulogies by his grandson, George P. Bush, and lifelong friend and former Secretary of State James Baker.

President Bush was a contemporary of my own father, also a WWII naval fighter pilot, and while I had met with Mr. Bush on occasions when he was serving with President Reagan, what I knew best about him was what I knew about my own father and their shared generation: They were prepared to give their lives en masse to defend Liberty for all people.

I will be devoting an in-depth column/analysis to President Bush on Wednesday, but wanted to share a few of his memorable words today — words that best expressed what he strived for as president.

In his 1988 Republican National Convention acceptance speech, he declared, “We are a nation of communities — of thousands and tens of thousands of ethnic, religious, social, business, labor union, neighborhood, regional, and other organizations, all of them varied, voluntary, and unique. This is America … a brilliant diversity spread like stars, like a thousand points of light in a broad and peaceful sky. … I am guided by certain traditions. One is that there is a God and He is good, and His love, while free, has a self-imposed cost: We must be good to one another.”

In his inaugural address, President Bush said: “There has grown a certain divisiveness. "We have seen the hard looks and heard the statements in which not each other’s ideas are challenged but each other’s motives. And our great parties have too often been far apart and untrusting of each other. A new breeze is blowing, and the old bipartisanship must be made new again.”

He concluded, “The American people await action. They didn’t send us here to bicker. They ask us to rise above the merely partisan. ‘In crucial things, unity’ — and this, my friends, is crucial.”

Unfortunately, in the years since, that “bickering” has devolved into politically deranged division not experienced since the War Between the States.

Tailwinds and following seas, Mr. President.

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Judge Gets Federalism Backwards on Sanctuary Cities

Thomas Gallatin

Yet again, a judicial despot has blocked one of President Donald Trump’s immigration actions. This time, a federal judge in New York ruled against Trump’s decision to withhold federal funding from cities or states that enact illegal-alien-harboring “sanctuary” policies. Again, Trump isn’t trying to change those laws; he’s just defunding cities and states that have them. In the ruling, however, Judge Edgardo Ramos wrote that “the separation of powers acts as a check on tyranny and the concentration of power.” Unfortunately, Ramos’s understanding and application of the Constitution’s separation of powers principle is, well, unconstitutional.

Separation of powers begins from the understanding that everything is under state and local jurisdiction unless specifically delineated by the Constitution to be a responsibility of the federal government. In this case, the issue of immigration — who is and is not allowed entry into the nation — comes under the purview of the federal government, not that of the individual states — much less cities. Logically, if individual states are free to set their own policies on immigration enforcement, what’s to stop one state’s polices from colliding with that of another state? Confusion and conflict will abound. Like national defense, immigration enforcement rightly falls under the authority of the federal government. Ramos gets federalism backwards.

Democrats and leftists are disingenuously using federalism in a bid to gain power. The irony is that their globalist agenda would end federalism, replacing it with a top-down elitist form of globalist socialism, which they love to preach as being more democratic. Communists have been playing the one-party-rule game for a long time now.

Meanwhile, Texas just filed a lawsuit against the city of San Antonio and its police chief for violating the state’s 2017 law banning sanctuary cities. According to Ramos’s understanding, would a city government have greater authority than the state government to create laws that impact the entire state, not to mention the entire country?

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ON THE WEB TODAY

BEST OF RIGHT OPINION

For more of today’s columns, visit Right Opinion.

TOP HEADLINES

  • Mexico’s new president signs deal to stop migrants (The Washington Times)
  • Tijuana shuts down caravan shelter (The Washington Times)
  • Border agents arrest MS-13 gang member and convicted killer traveling with caravan (Fox News)
  • Pelosi pledges to pass Dream Act with House majority (CBS News)
  • Trump and Xi agree to a 90-day trade truce (CNBC)
  • Russia has 80,000 troops in occupied Ukraine (Newsweek)
  • Comey backs off legal challenge to subpoena, says he’ll testify to House in private (Washington Examiner)
  • Google employees debated burying conservative media in search (The Daily Caller)
  • Nice work if you can get it: Al Sharpton sells rights to his life story for $531K — to his own charity (Fox News)
  • Consumer debt is set to hit $4 trillion (CNBC)
  • Humor: Obama boasts that ObamaCare has reduced health care costs by lowering life expectancy: “Thank me for that” (The Babylon Bee)
  • Policy: A nightmare farm bill for conservatives (The Daily Signal)
  • Policy: Harvard study shows the dangers of early school enrollment (Foundation for Economic Education)

For more of today’s news, visit Patriot Headline Report.

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TODAY’S MEME

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For more of today’s memes, visit the Memesters Union.

TODAY’S CARTOON

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For more of today’s top cartoons, visit the Cartoons archive.

FEATURED ANALYSIS

Teaching Americans to Despise America

Arnold Ahlert

“Congratulations to the leftists who’ve taken over the nation’s public education system. They’re now producing generations of Americans who know little about their own country, other than that they hate it.” —editorial, Investor’s Business Daily

Investor’s Business Daily is referring to the latest YouGov poll conducted by the Foundation for Liberty and American Greatness (FLAG). It questioned 1,078 Americans aged 14 and up about their knowledge of America’s history, institutions and patriotism, and one suspects most Patriot Post readers know where this is going. Like this writer, regular readers at this site are beginning to realize that younger generations of Americans increasingly see us all as anachronistic pariahs with wholly illegitimate values that must be “fundamentally transformed” — out of existence. The idea expressed by John Adams that our Constitution “was made only for a moral and religious people” and is “wholly inadequate to the government of any other” no longer resonates.

Today, morality is “relative,” religion is for “bitter clingers,” and it’s likely a majority of young Americans have never heard of John Adams. Older generations of Americans have been reduced to being proverbial keepers of the flame, hoping this nation can outlast the tsunami of orchestrated ignorance so all-encompassing that even “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” is cannon-fodder for the terminally offended.

Thus, the survey’s key findings are completely unsurprising:

  • Half of those surveyed believe the United States is sexist (50%) and racist (49%)
  • 46% of younger Americans do not agree that “America is the greatest country in the world”
  • 38% of younger Americans do not agree that “America has a history that we should be proud of”
  • One in eight (14%) of Millennials agree that “America was never a great country and it never will be”
  • 46% of younger Americans agree that “America is more racist than other countries”
  • 84% of Americans do not know the specific rights enumerated in the First Amendment
  • 19% of Millennials believe that the American flag is “a sign of intolerance and hatred”
  • 44% of younger Americans believe Barack Obama had a “bigger impact” on America than George Washington

There is a political agenda underlying every activity — an agenda historian Victor Davis Hanson accurately describes as a “progressive synopticon” where the 40-45% of traditional Americans are “relentlessly lectured, sermonized, demonized, and neutered by a 360- degree ring of prying institutional overseers.”

Overseers determined to institutionalize contempt for America in general, and its exceptional nature in particular.

The late Andrew Breitbart once observed that politics is “downstream” from culture. Everything is downstream from education, and four years of “seed planting” has been expanded to 13 years, if one goes from kindergarten through the 12th grade, and 17 years if one goes on to attend one of the Marxist finishing schools purporting to be colleges.

In a column entitled, “Here’s What College Freshmen Are Reading,” NPR reveals how the bedrock principles of Western civilization and our constitutional republic have been supplanted by a curriculum of identity politics. The classic literature that used to be the backbone of a legitimate education? As the National Association of Scholars reveals, “67 percent of common reading books assigned were published after 2011.”

Of course they were. One can only imagine the consternation that might arise if those same students were required to read something like the collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay known as The Federalist Papers. No doubt they would be astonished to discover that men routinely dismissed by many of their “woke” professors as “dead, white slave owners” had incredibly keen insight with regard to human nature. Those same students might even be embarrassed to discover that such complex ideas were published in newspapers and read by ordinary citizens.

Yet barring self-discovery, they will never know any of it. Today it is far more important to be well-versed in the politics of victimization, group grievances, genderism, racism, white supremacy, etc. Better to hate America for the sin of slavery than celebrate the enormous effort undertaken to eradicate it. Better to celebrate the “glory” of socialism while remaining largely contemptuous of the capitalism that lifted more people out of poverty than any other economic system in the history of the planet. Better to be so bereft of economic acumen that the idea of “free” anything actually resonates. Better to be younger Americans obsessed with “rights” even as only 11% of high schoolers could name those enumerated in the First Amendment.

Better to assume that anyone who disagrees with you is not wrong, but evil.

Given the popularity of moral relativism, the irony is stupendous. Nonetheless, reducing one’s opponents to evil is, by far, the most useful convention employed by those invested in upending everything that does not align itself with progressive dogma. If one is evil, debate becomes unnecessary, and the ends of eradicating such evil justify the means for doing so — even when those means engender a justice system wholly contaminated by double standards.

“We suspected that we would find decreasing numbers of Americans well-versed in our nation’s most important principles and young people less patriotic than the generations that came before, but we were totally unprepared for what our national survey reveals: an epidemic of anti-Americanism,” stated FLAG founder Nick Adams.

Adams is naive. The opposite of anti-Americanism is pro-globalism, and it’s time Americans (who still want to be Americans) realize the ongoing bastardization of traditions, morals, law, language, culture, and borders — along with the unconscionable student data collection taking place in America’s classrooms — is all part of the same agenda. One cannot make a globalist omelet without breaking nationalist eggs, and nothing is more important than making sure America’s youth are ready to “transition” from being proudly American to being “citizens of the world.”

As the survey demonstrates, it is a transition well under way.

While the Senate is still controlled by Republicans, it would behoove those members of the GOP who still believe in national sovereignty to conduct nationally televised hearings exposing this agenda. Hearings that should be considered the beginning of a wholesale pushback. A pushback that must continue until the restoration of our founding principles takes hold. We have abided the wholesale inculcation of ideological conformity in lieu of independent thinking, as well as the legitimization of emotion over reason, for far too long.

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OPINION IN BRIEF

Rich Lowry: “The president is the chief executive, and like it or not, Trump is president. … If the president can fire the attorney general (the ill-used Jeff Sessions attests that he can), he certainly can fire Mueller. The attorney general is a much more important position than the special counsel. In compelling Senate testimony, Yale law professor Akhil Amar explained the constitutional problems with the Mueller protection bill. One is that to be constitutional, the special counsel must be an inferior officer. Otherwise, he has to be confirmed by the Senate, which Mueller wasn’t. And if he’s an inferior officer, he can be fired. Mueller can’t be an inferior officer in some respects and a hypersuperior officer in others, enjoying protections from his ouster that even Cabinet officials don’t enjoy. … Trump has huffed and puffed about Mueller, yet cooperated — in some instances, quite fulsomely — with his investigation. That could change at any time. But firing Mueller would lead to dire political consequences, and now fail to achieve its end of truly shutting him down. If cashiered, Mueller would presumably show up in January as the first witness before Rep. Jerry Nadler’s Judiciary Committee and spill all he knows. That’s probably all the protection Mueller needs, and certainly all the protection he can legitimately be afforded.”

SHORT CUTS

The Gipper: “Public servants say, always with the best of intentions, ‘What greater service we could render if only we had a little more money and a little more power.’ But the truth is that outside of its legitimate function, government does nothing as well or as economically as the private sector.”

For the record I: “Fewer homicides were committed by political terrorists of any stripe in the United States in 2017 than were committed by undocumented immigrants in the state of Texas alone.” —David Harsanyi

For the record II: “I look at these documents and I don’t see any evidence of conspiracy between members of the Trump team and the Russian government to interfere in the election.” —CNN’s Jake Tapper

Upright I: “California just defies logic to me. … This election system they have, I can’t begin to understand what ballot harvesting is. … When you win the absentee ballots and you win the in-person vote, where I come from, you win the election.” —House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI)

Upright II: “As a conservative, I don’t dispute that President Trump has done more to advance the conservative policy sphere than President George H. W. Bush did. As a conservative, I also note that President Trump has done far more to corrupt and pervert conservatism than President Bush did.” —Erick Erickson

Friendly fire: “This demand for purity, this looking down your nose at people who want to compromise, is a recipe for disaster for the Democrats. Will we ever get to a majority in the Senate again, much less to 60, if we do not have some moderates in our party?” —Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO)

Non Compos Mentis: “We’ve done what we thought was impossible. We went to the moon. We electrified the nation. We established civil rights. We enfranchised the country. We dug deep and we did it. We did it, when no one else thought that we could. That’s what we did when so many of us won an election this year. That’s what so many of us did.” —Congresswoman-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Feminist infighting: “Marriage still ain’t equal, y'all. It ain’t equal. I tell women that whole ‘you can have it all’ mmm, nope, not at the same time; that’s a lie. It’s not always enough to lean in because that s—t doesn’t work.” —Michelle Obama rejecting Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s assertion in a book titled Lean In, invoking her fake Southern drawl when trying to incite outrage among her emotionally incontinent female fans. She later walked back the comment, saying, “I thought we were at home, y'all. I was gettin’ real comfortable up in here.”

And last… “Lying to Congress is a very bad thing to do — but apparently only if you are a Republican. There are all kinds of people walking around Washington from the previous administration who repeatedly misled Congress and none of them have been brought to justice. Lois Lerner, John Brennan, Hillary Clinton, Eric Holder, Loretta Lynch, and James Comey come to mind.” —Gary Bauer

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Join our editors and staff in daily prayer for our Patriots in uniform — Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen — standing in harm’s way in defense of Liberty, and for their families. We also humbly ask prayer for your Patriot team, that our mission would seed and encourage the spirit of Liberty in the hearts and minds of our countrymen.

Semper Vigilans Fortis Paratus et Fidelis

Nate Jackson, Managing Editor
Mark Alexander, Publisher

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