Right Opinion

The Rise and Fall of Steve Bannon

Burt Prelutsky · Jan. 13, 2018

I don’t know why Donald Trump ever invited Steve Bannon into his world, but he has obviously seen the error of his ways. Which explains why President Trump recently remarked that after Bannon lost his job in the administration, “he also lost his mind.”

I think that all happened several years earlier. But it’s obvious that being that close to actual power frazzled Bannon’s tiny brain. It gave him delusions of grandeur, so he felt he had the authority to declare that every Republican officeholder in Washington was a swamp creature who deserved to be removed from office and replaced, no doubt by someone who had been hand-selected by Bannon.

It’s bad enough that Bannon looks like one of those trolls who sleeps under bridges, but it seems he lacks the basic ability to see any difference between the likes of Tom Cotton, Trey Gowdy, Devin Nunes and Jim Jordan, and, say, John McCain, Jeff Flake, Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins.

If they have an R after their name, Bannon wants them sent home, kicking and screaming if need be.

Although Bannon refers to himself as a Trump ally, he is as toxic as a New Jersey garbage dump. He has already cost the president a sure vote in the Senate. It was bad enough that Bannon greased the skids for Sen. Luther Strange, a man pledged to support Trump’s agenda, but he then led the push for Roy Moore, a publicity-crazed egomaniac who was very likely the only Republican in the entire state of Alabama who could have lost an election to a Democrat.


Speaking of toxic, the boneheaded crusade that left-wing pinheads have engaged in ever since Al Gore came up with the moneymaking scam he dubbed global warming isn’t the first time that those flying the flag of liberalism have given science a black eye and the world a big kick in the rump.

A few decades ago, in 1962, to be specific, the suckers fell for a cockeyed Pied Piper named Rachel Carson, who sounded the alarm against DDT, a perfectly safe pesticide, in a book she titled The Silent Spring. She succeeded in ushering in a new era of malaria and was personally responsible for hundreds of millions of deaths, particularly in the Third World. The disease, which had been all but eliminated, had a bigger comeback than the one Al Jolson enjoyed after the release of The Jolson Story in 1946.

Noting how well scary books sold, a Stanford professor named Paul Ehrlich made his own fortune in 1968 with one he called The Population Bomb. His prophecy was that within a few short years, the earth would be overpopulated and that widespread starvation would be inevitable.

Even though Rachel Carson did her part in keeping the world’s population down, people kept procreating. But something else a few of them managed to do was to come up with new ways to grow, harvest and transport food. That’s not to say that certain places haven’t faced starvation over the past 50 years, but the fault lies with corrupt governments, not with the earth’s inability to feed its inhabitants.

The one thing that never changes, though, is that the alarmists are rarely if ever called on the carpet to explain why their predictions haven’t been borne out by actual events.

Even Al Gore, who assured us in the late ‘90s that the oceans would rise 20 feet, turning Omaha into a seaside resort, can walk safely through the streets of America and not have people ridicule him or toss rocks in his direction.


When I recently listed my favorite and least favorite pop singers, a few of his fans asked why I hadn’t mentioned Dean Martin. I wrote back to explain that if I had expanded the list by one name, it would have been Deano’s. At the same time, it occurred to me that had I expanded the other list by one, it would have been another Martin, Tony. That man could turn any song into a bedtime lullaby. I’m not sure I ever managed to stay awake through any of his songs, even when he shared the screen with the Marx Brothers.


Someone else alerted me to the fact that 25% of the so-called “Dreamers” are functionally illiterate in English. Makes me wonder if they were busy dreaming when they were supposed to be getting an education.

The reason, of course, that Schumer, Pelosi, Jerry Brown, Rahm Emanuel, Bill De Blasio and their legion of stooges keep portraying these 700,000 people as bright, hard-working and patriotic is because 100% of them will register and vote as Democrats.

I have suggested that we grant amnesty to those of the 700,000 who have both graduated from high school and served in the U.S. military, and allow the other 699,000 to take their chances.


Someone — I can’t recall who because his email address doesn’t include his name — sent me his solution to the nation’s immigration problems. When it comes to the Mexican border, it involves digging a two-thousand-mile-long moat; sending the dirt to New Orleans to raise its level above that of the Mississippi River; and filling the moat with Florida alligators, changing their diet from golfers and small dogs to wetbacks.

He goes on to point out that during the mad cow epidemic, the feds were able to track a single cow born three years earlier to a barn stall in Oregon, but they are unable to track down 11 million illegal aliens. His suggestion is to give each illegal alien a cow.

Moving on, he keeps hearing that Iraq is seeking a new constitution. He suggests giving them ours, seeing that we don’t seem to be using it.

He concludes that the real reason we can’t have the Ten Commandments posted in a courthouse is because it’s not right to post “Thou Shalt Not Steal,” “Thou Shalt Not Lie” and “Thou Shalt Not Commit Adultery” in a building filled with judges, lawyers and politicians, because it creates a hostile work environment.


Because Disqus won’t allow me to comment, anyone who wishes to communicate can reach me at burtprelutsky@icloud.com.

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