Right Opinion

Consensus Isn't Science

Burt Prelutsky · Nov. 12, 2018

There are so many lies disseminated by those on the left that you’d need more than one scorecard to keep track. But one of the silliest is what started out as “global warming” and then morphed into “climate change” when Mother Nature wouldn’t aid and abet Al Gore in the hoax by melting icebergs, drowning polar bears, and raising sea levels by 20 feet.

The initial giveaway, even before people noticed their heads weren’t melting, was that the hucksters kept referring to a consensus of scientists who agreed things were heating up. That’s not the way science works. Something has either been proven or it hasn’t been. For example, it’s been proven that e=mc squared, whereas Darwin’s notion regarding the biological evolution of the species remains only a theory.

I imagine that the phonies who go around peddling false science got their ideas from the advertising of the ‘40s, '50s, and '60s, when Madison Avenue tried conning people into buying certain brands of laundry soap, cold cream, and cigarettes by using models decked out to look like doctors and other experts telling us that four out of five or nine out of 10 agreed that brand X got whites whiter, that brand Y prevented cavities, or brand Z tasted good like a cigarette should.

That sort of consensus was relatively harmless because everyone knew they were being fed a load of malarkey to get us to buy one product instead of another. But when so-called experts are trying to put certain industries out of business because they don’t happen to like oil or coal or the people who drill or dig for it, or even an industrial nation, such as the United States, which has used the energy to make the lives of most Americans better, it’s not harmless.

It explains why the socialists have teamed up with the ambulance chasers to make the case that it’s oil and coal companies that are behind any bad weather that occurs anywhere on earth, and they must be made to pay through the nose for it.

The fact, as James Murphy made clear in an article titled “Manufacturing Immediate Fear of Climate Change” in a recent issue of The New American: “The frequency of hits by hurricanes on the United States has gone down by 50% since the 1930s and 1940s. There’s been no increase in floods. Tornadoes are down, but still weather varies a lot, especially hurricanes, year to year, decade to decade.

"If there’s a human influence in there, you wouldn’t know it because there’s so much natural variability.

"Climate alarmists attempt to lay blame for weather events not on 'Acts of God,’ as the old insurance agency vernacular would call them, but on fossil-fuel companies and anyone else they see as complicit in extreme weather events.”

And the deeper their pockets, the more complicit they are.


Stephen Hanover wrote to say: “I wish someone would find the rock underneath which Sean Penn has crawled and ask him how he thinks his buddy Hugo Chavez’s country has turned out. These Hollywood ignoramuses never get called to account for their stupidity.”

I beg to differ. One of them just was.


According to Bob Hunt, a black child asked his mother to explain socialism and racism.

“Well, child, socialism is when the white folks work every day so that blacks, Latinos, and Muslims can get all our government entitlement stuff for free. You know, like our cell phones, rent subsidy, food stamps, free school lunches, free health care, and so on and so forth. That’s socialism.”

“But, mama, don’t the white people ever get upset about that?”

“Sure they do, honey. That’s called racism.”


While recovering from a recent bout with bronchitis, I’ve been sucking on Halls cough drops. Generally, I ignore the tiny spots on the wrappers. I just assumed they were part of the design. Only today, I noticed they were actually little printed letters. Each wrapper seems to have five or six different messages, including “Keep your chin up,” “Let’s hear your battle cry,” “Put a little strut in it,” “Don’t try harder. Do harder!” “You got it in you,” “Dust off and get up,” “Conquer today,” “Be resilient,” “Take charge and mean it,” and “Elicit a few ‘wows’ today.”

By just sitting here, coughing my lungs out, I feel like I’ve let the Halls team down.

Frankly, I’m unclear on the message. I mean, if they were telling me to take it easy, rest up, lie in bed, and keep sucking, I’d get it. But the idea of putting a little strut in it or even being resilient is falling on deaf ears. The only thing I’m eliciting are coughing spasms and a truckload of “Oy veys.”


Frank Hawkins, a retired former U.S. Army intelligence officer/UP foreign correspondent/businessman, has come up with a list of the 10 most destructive Americans of the past eight decades.

Because I disagree not with the names but with the order in which he placed them, I’m listing them alphabetically:

Bill Ayers; Jimmy Carter; the Clintons, Bill & Hillary; Walter Cronkite; Mark Felt; Valerie Jarrett; Lyndon B. Johnson; Ted Kennedy; John Kerry; and Barack Obama.

His runners-up are: John Brennan; Frank Marshall Davis; Jane Fonda; Jimmy Hendrix; Robert Johnson; Janice Joplin; George Soros; and Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr.

I’m not saying my own list would be the same as his. Although I tend to be with him when it comes to politicians, I verge slightly when it comes to those who have done the most to destroy pop culture.

He listed Hendrix, Joplin, and Robert Johnson. The first two because they helped usher in the drug culture; Johnson because, as the head of the Black TV Network, he promoted the stereotype of urban blacks through such crapola as “Jigga My Nigga,” “Niggas in Paris,” “Big Pimpin,‘” and “Strictly 4 My N.I.G.G.A.Z.”

I can see a case being made for Johnson, but I think John Belushi did more to advance the drug culture than Joplin and Hendrix put together.

Looking at the list, I’m struck by the fact that of the 19 names on the list, the last names of only three of the miscreants start with a letter after “K.” In spite of the fact that Q, X, Y, and Z use up four of the 15 remaining spots, that strikes me as very odd.


We’ll close with a bunch of quotes that are attributed to a lot of people I don’t believe ever said anything funny or original in their lives, so I’ll only credit them to those who might actually have said them.

“As I sat, strapped in my seat waiting during the countdown, one thought kept crossing my mind: every part of this rocket was supplied by the lowest bidder.” —John Glenn

“After the game, the King and the Pawn go into the same box.” —Italian proverb

“When a man opens a car door for his wife, it’s either a new car or a new wife.”

“Wood burns faster when you have to chop it yourself.”

“The only reason they say: 'Women and children first’ is to test the strength of the lifeboats.” —Jean Kerr

“Lawyers believe a man is innocent until proven broke.”

“We are here on earth to do good unto others. What the others are here for, I have no idea.”

“I don’t believe in astrology. I am a Sagittarius and we’re very skeptical.” —Arthur C. Clarke

“The first piece of luggage on the airport carousel never belongs to anybody.”

“Hollywood must be the only place on earth where you can be fired by a man wearing a Hawaiian shirt and a baseball cap.” —Steve Martin

“If God had intended for us to fly, he would have made it easier to get to the airport.”

“The weather person is the only person I know that can be wrong 99.9% of the time and still have a job the next day.” —Johnny Carson

“I have kleptomania, but when it gets really bad, I take something for it.” —Robert Benchley

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