To our readers: Your generosity and commitment have made it possible to offer The Patriot Post without a subscription fee to military personnel, students and those with limited means — for over 23 years! Please support The 2020 Patriots' Day Campaign today.

Sanctity of Life Day

Today marks the 40th anniversary of the two most tragic Supreme Court decisions in American history, Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton. Those decisions sparked a contentious debate between those who would deny that babies in the womb are worthy of legal protection, and those who rightly acknowledge that those babies constitute "life" as understood throughout history and affirmed in our Declaration of Independence. That right has been tragically denied to countless millions of unborn children who have been sacrificed on the altar of "choice" since 1973.

Jan. 22, 2013

Today marks the 40th anniversary of the two most tragic Supreme Court decisions in American history, Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton. Those decisions sparked a contentious debate between those who would deny that babies in the womb are worthy of legal protection, and those who rightly acknowledge that those babies constitute “life” as understood throughout history and affirmed in our Declaration of Independence. That right has been tragically denied to countless millions of unborn children who have been sacrificed on the altar of “choice” since 1973.

Roe v. Wade was the infamous Texas case where Norma McCorvey was used as a plaintiff by Leftist attorneys to overturn laws restricting abortions in Texas, and ultimately on appeal to the Supreme Court, found a heretofore unprecedented “right to privacy” in the so-called “due process clause” of the Fourteenth Amendment. The Despotic Branch“ divined from their ”living constitution“ that this right entitled a mother to end the life of her baby before its birth.

Simultaneous with Roe v. Wade, in Doe v. Bolton, using the plaintiff Sandra Cano, the Supremes determined that any complaint – including headaches – could be used as grounds for requesting an abortion.

Since the decisions in those cases, both McCorvey and Cano have recanted their testimony. Norma McCorvey said plainly, "I think abortion’s wrong. I think what I did with Roe v. Wade was wrong,” and she has stood by those words in the years since.

Sandra Cano, in her 2005 testimony before the U.S. Senate, said: “Using my name and life, Doe v. Bolton falsely created the health exception that led to abortion on demand and partial birth abortion. How it got there is still pretty much a mystery to me. I only sought legal assistance to get a divorce from my husband and to get my children from foster care. … At no time did I ever have an abortion. I did not seek an abortion nor do I believe in abortion. Yet my name and life is now forever linked with the slaughter of 40-50 million babies. … How can cunning, wicked lawyers use an uneducated, defenseless pregnant woman to twist the American court system in such a fraudulent way? Doe has been a nightmare. … My name, life, and identity have been stolen and put on this case without my knowledge and against my wishes. How dare they use my name and my life this way! One of the Justices of the Supreme Court said during oral argument in my case ‘What does it matter if she is real or not.’ Well I am real and it does matter.”

So are the babies who have been ripped from wombs.

Both women have been guests in my home. They are good and decent people who at a very vulnerable time in their lives were used by Leftist jurists to advance a horrendous agenda. Both women were instrumental in the establishment of the National Memorial for the Unborn, and their respective statements on abortion are enshrined there.

Celebrating the occasion last year, Barack Hussein Obama said, “[W]e must remember that this Supreme Court decision not only protects a woman’s health and reproductive freedom but also affirms a broader principle: that government should not intrude on private family matters. I remain committed to protecting a woman’s right to choose and this fundamental constitutional right. … As we remember this historic anniversary, we must also continue our efforts to ensure that our daughters have the same rights, freedoms and opportunities as our sons to fulfill their dreams.”

And I repeat, millions of babies sacrificed on the altar of “choice” in the name of freedom…

The Órko tou Ippokrátiis, commonly called the Physicians Hippocratic Oath, dates back to 500 BC. It is the first known physician’s oath, and the essential message, “Do all to heal and do no harm,” was and remains a seminal statement of moral of conduct for physicians.

The Oath’s first and foremost standard of care translates, “I will prescribe regimens for the good of my patients according to my ability and my judgment and never do harm to anyone. I will not give a lethal drug to anyone if I am asked, nor will I advise such a plan; and similarly I will not give a woman a pessary to cause an abortion.”

It has always been evident, scientifically and morally, that life begins at conception. For the last word on the matter, we consult our Creator’s guidebook. The Psalmist wrote, “For You formed my inward parts; you wove me in my mother’s womb.” He then noted, “Your eyes have seen my unformed substance; and in Your book were written all the days that were ordained for me, when as yet there was not one of them.”

Imago Dei!

Semper Vigilo, Fortis, Paratus et Fidelis! Libertas aut Mortis!
Mark Alexander, Publisher, The Patriot Post

Don’t miss out while "Social Distancing."
Stay in the know with The Patriot Post — America’s News Digest.