Right Hooks

Raucous Leftist Women Pitch a Fit

Being vulgar and nasty doesn't advance a worthy idea.

Nate Jackson · Jan. 23, 2017

Our new favorite satire website, The Babylon Bee, headlined the weekend’s women’s march more appropriately than any (ahem) real news outlet did: “March Defends Women’s Right To Choose Conformity With Only One Political Viewpoint.” Of course, we noted a similar theme last week — that Some Women Are More Equal Than Others. So you get the point: Saturday’s march wasn’t about empowering all women, but rather about a bunch of aggrieved leftist loudmouths with nothing productive to do on a Saturday.

The march wasn’t confined to Washington either, but spread to cities around the world. Marches in the U.S. had a distinctly anti-Trump flavor, helped by the timing one day after the inauguration. Some estimated that more than one million people marched in Washington, with millions more in other cities. If you ventured onto social media this weekend, though, you already knew this, thanks to your obnoxious relatives and friends reveling in “speaking truth to power” or whatever.

But how did women speak this truth and demand due respect? With posters about their body parts or sexual proclivities that are far too vulgar to reprint or even paraphrase in this family publication. And they did it with speeches from Hollywood celebrities — symbols of the rich, famous and powerful. Actress Ashley Judd boasted, “I’m a nasty woman — a loud, vulgar, proud woman.” She elaborated on why, but we’ll leave that detail for her unfortunate audience. She also warned of “Hitler in these streets” (meaning Trump and his supporters) and other explicit Nazi references. Don’t leftists ever tire of comparing normal American conservatives to Nazi socialists? Maybe it’s because the comparison makes no sense whatsoever that they continue to make it.

Madonna, another poor, persecuted celebrity, declared that she had “thought an awful lot about blowing up the White House.” How such terrorism advances the interest of women was left unsaid.

Sympathetic media coverage could propel this ragtag band to movement status and make it a factor in 2018. The Washington Post thinks “the liberal tea party movement has begun.” But whereas the Tea Party was unified around standing for Liberty and Rule of Law and opposing the unconstitutional abuses of the Obama administration, these women (and men) who marched weren’t there to advance any particular cohesive idea. No, they were largely there to pitch a collective fit.

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