Faith

Methodist Church Split a Victory for the Rainbow Mafia

The plan to split the nation's second-largest Protestant denomination is a rejection of Scripture.

Louis DeBroux · Jan. 8, 2020

Even the most casual observer must now see that the political Left doesn’t build, uplift, or edify. It only destroys. And nowhere is that destruction more apparent than in the Christian church.

That is why recent news of a plan to split the United Methodist Church into separate factions — one upholding the authority of Scripture, particularly the biblical view of marriage, and one that rejects the Bible’s authority — is the latest in a distressing trend regarding the faith and religiosity of the American people, and what that portends for the future of our republic.

Methodism is the second-largest Protestant denomination in the United States, traditionally rooted in a serious study of the Bible. Yet it is a debate over the nature and role of the Bible within that faith that has led to an irreconcilable schism.

That schism came to a head last week, with the church announcing plans for a formal split, citing “fundamental differences” over the issues of same-sex marriage and the ordination of homosexual clergy.

Last February at its General Conference, church leaders voted for the “Traditional” plan, upholding a biblical view of marriage as between a man and a woman, as well as reiterating that sex is proper only within the bonds of marriage. In rejecting the “One Church” plan, which would have allowed local churches to perform same-sex weddings and hire openly LGBT clergy, churches instead faced removal from the denomination for failure to affirm the church’s opposition to same-sex marriage.

Making the issue even more delicate was the fact that nearly half of the delegates to the General Conference were from overseas, mostly Africa, and overwhelmingly supported upholding the same-sex ban.

The Reverend Jerry Kulah of Liberia explained that “the church in Africa would cease to exist” if the bans were ceased, noting, “We can’t do anything but to support the Traditional Plan — it is the biblical plan.”

This led to acrimony, with pro-LGBT delegates claiming the “Traditional Plan” was rooted in bigotry and hatred for LGBT members. Conversely, some sense an element of racism behind the split because liberal white American members don’t want church policy and standards dictated by an alliance between the black African members and their conservative American allies.

At its core, however, the divisions are not over race or even sexuality, but theology.

Traditional, evangelical Christians believe the Bible to be the word of God as written — inerrant and infallible. God’s commandments are what they are, and we can choose to obey or disobey, but it is not within the authority of man to alter His Word.

Mainline Christians believe in God, and the reality of Jesus as an important and influential historical figure, but they may or not believe in the divinity of Christ, or the idea that his death on the cross “represented a necessary, substitutionary sacrifice for human sin.”

Those supporting the “Traditional Plan” certainly don’t view themselves as driven by animus toward LGBT people. They see no conflict in loving members dealing with gender disorientation while rejecting behaviors the Bible deems to be sin.

Sadly, as the world becomes more hostile to traditional biblical teachings, churches will be forced to choose between aligning with God’s Word as revealed through Scripture, or adopting a “Christian-lite” theology that is more tolerant by society’s standards, but that rejects fundamental Christian principles.

We’ve seen how that story ends, though.

In recent years, both the American Episcopal and Presbyterian churches suffered divisions over same-sex marriage — also driven by differences in the view of Scripture. In both cases, the faction adopting the politically correct, amended view of Christianity withered. Likewise, when the Boy Scouts elected to allow homosexual leaders and discarded the vow of morality taken by all Scouts for more than a century, membership plummeted.

Why?

Because Christians whose lives are deeply rooted in their faith will not compromise on foundational principles and scriptural truth. Belief in Christ is not a buffet. You don’t pick and choose. Either Christ is the Son of God made flesh, or He isn’t. Either He died on the cross and arose on the third day, or He didn’t. Either He atoned for our sins, or He didn’t. If He didn’t, then the faith is a farce.

But if He did, then who are we to question Him, much less seek to negotiate His commandments?

This is perfectly captured in the words of the Apostle Peter. When many followers turned from Christ, the Lord asked the Twelve, “Will ye also go away?” To which Peter replied, “Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life.”

America, and much of the Western world, is in a period of declining faith and religiosity. Many will leave the faith rather than deal with the hateful onslaught of the Rainbow Mafia, which demonizes, marginalizes, and attacks all who will not conform to their immoral, anti-religious agenda.

But those who are faithful disciples will not waver, and will not compromise, but will be strengthened in the furnace of affliction, and in the process will be brought even closer to Christ. As shown in the story of Gideon, God can do far more with a small band of faithful servants than with a large army of the faithless.

A church more focused on entertainment and worldly acceptance does not have the power of salvation.

The question now is, what will become of the American republic? John Adams declared our Constitution was made only for a “moral and religious people.” Without a foundation of religion and morality, can we expect the republic to survive?

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