Taxes

Taxes and the Vindictive Nature of the Left

The Washington Post argues that the GOP's tax plan is "regressive" because the wealthy benefit more.

Political Editors · Dec. 19, 2017

Democrats and the Leftmedia often accuse conservatives and Republicans of being interested only in catering to the interests of the wealthy. They, on the other hand, claim for themselves the mantel of defenders of the interests of the poor and working class. No more has this false assertion been more evident than in recent weeks as the GOP has worked to bring about significant tax reform that benefits the vast majority of Americans. With Republicans on the brink of enacting the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (pending a re-vote in the House over rule tweaks), The Washington Post published an article labeling the plan as “more regressive than current law.”

After admitting that the GOP tax bill will indeed lower taxes for 95% of Americans, the Post proceeds to explain why this is a bad thing. Referencing the leftist Tax Policy Center as if it were an unbiased, nonpartisan organization, the Post argues that the tax bill is unfair because the wealthy would receive the most in tax relief. Talk about a vindictive perspective. Evidently, the Post would prefer that no one get tax relief if the wealthy should in any way benefit. Sticking it to the rich is of greater importance than supporting tax cuts for all Americans, as well as spurring economic growth.

According to the Post, “In 2018, taxpayers earning less than $25,000 would receive an average tax cut of $60. … Those earning between $49,000 and $86,000 would get an average cut of about $900; those earning between $308,000 and $733,000 would receive an average cut of $13,500; and those earning more than $733,000 would receive an average cut of $51,000.” A mere $60 cut does seem rather paltry compared to $51,000. But most taxpayers earning less than $25,000 don’t actually pay income taxes. So how are they supposed to get a “cut”? And “those earning more than $733,000” includes people making multiple millions per year. Thus the “average cut of $51,000” seems more understandable.

Indeed, as Veronique de Rugy writes, “Over 70 percent of the tax is paid by the top 10 percent of earners. That means any reform of the income tax is probably going to affect them the most.” And yet after the bill becomes law, the top 10% will pay even more of the overall burden.

Still, the Post then quotes TPC director Mark Mazur, who states, “Overall, the conference agreement is more regressive than current law.” Notice the use of the loaded term “regressive.” It implies that Republicans are seeking to move backwards and undo “progress.” Because progress to the Left is moving away from individual freedom to an increasingly powerful and controlling governmental authority built on income redistribution. Taxation is one of the primary means by which this power exchange is accomplished.

The reality is not that the Post is worried about the poor and middle class Americans not getting a fair shake; rather it’s the fact that this bill effectively downsizes the government’s claim on other people’s money. This bill limits the government, and that’s what they don’t like.

(Updated.)

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