Energy

Second Study: Fracking Doesn't Contaminate Groundwater

Once again, the ecofascist dogmatic narrative against fracking isn't supported by the facts.

Political Editors · May 11, 2018

A new study on the practice of hydraulic fracturing (otherwise known as fracking) recently published in the Springer corroborates an earlier study conducted by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Both studies found that fracking to extract oil or natural gas resulted in no contamination of groundwater, a charge popularly leveled against the oil and gas industry by environmentalists.

Using a form of radiocarbon dating to detect traces of natural methane gas (CH4) in groundwater near fracking sites, the study concluded, “We found no relationship between CH4 concentration or source in groundwater and proximity to active gas well sites. No significant changes in CH4 concentration, CH4 isotopic composition, pH, or conductivity in water wells were observed during the study period. These data indicate that high levels of biogenic CH4 can be present in groundwater wells independent of hydraulic fracturing activity.” To sum it up, the study found no evidence of any groundwater contamination from fracking activity.

And while environmentalists and ecofascists are typically quick to dismiss any studies that don’t comport with their desired narrative, including attacking the source of the study’s funding (often claiming the bill was footed by profit-driven oil companies), that dodge of relevant science will not be possible with this study. The two organizations that funded the study were the David & Sara Weston Foundation, whose mission is to “enrich and strengthen underserved communities in … the arts, environmental conservation and social services,” and the Deer Creek Foundation, whose objective is to “enrich the cultural and artistic quality of life in St. Louis metropolitan area.” Will environmentalists listen or does their commitment to ecofascist dogma prevent objective analysis? We think we know the answer. But we suppose they can always try raw water instead…

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