Culture

Tinseltown Abides Pedophiles

Like a bad movie sequel, Hollywood is enduring its second major sex scandal in recent weeks.

Arnold Ahlert · Nov. 2, 2017

“Harvey we all knew about u — I hope more men come forward” —Rosie O'Donnell, reacting to allegations that actor Kevin Spacey made sexual advances toward actor Anthony Rapp when Rapp was 14

Like a bad movie sequel, Hollywood is enduring its second major sex scandal in recent weeks. And exactly like the Harvey Weinstein saga, legions of these self-aggrandizing, self-righteous phonies have long known about — and excused — sexual predation by their fellow celebrities. Unlike the Weinstein saga, that abhorrent “tolerance” countenanced pedophilia.

Decent Americans might be of two minds regarding the revelations about Weinstein, in that many of the women he abused were adults who chose to remain silent in exchange for fame and fortune. No doubt fear was an integral part of the equation, which is why most of these actresses have largely been excused for maintaining their silence, with the principle exceptions being made for those who asserted their after-the-fact feminist bona fides.

America is willing to forgive silence in the face of fear. Rank hypocrisy? Not so much.

By contrast, Hollywood closing ranks around child molesters is indefensible. Yet that’s precisely what it has done for years. “It’s a very taboo subject,” insists actor/director Alex Winter, who alleges he was sexually abused as a pre-teen child actor. “I don’t know of any boys in any pocket of the entertainment industry that do not encounter some form of predatory behavior.”

So why not speak out? Maybe victims are taking their cue from former ‘80s child star Corey Feldman, who has long accused the industry of abiding pedophiles who abused him and his friend Corey Haim. Haim died of a drug overdose in 2010 at age 38, and Feldman attributes his death to the inability to cope with his molestation.

A 2013 exchange with Barbara Walters, a woman treated with wholly unwarranted reverence, is indicative. Responding to Feldman’s claims she asks, “Are you saying that they’re pedophiles?” “Yes,” Feldman responds. “You’re damaging an entire industry!” Walters scolds.

Inadvertently, Walters’ use of the word “industry” may prove prophetic. Radar Online claims to know the identity of Haim’s abuser, stating “he is one of the most recognizable faces in the industry.” Radar further insists multiple sources claim he is the “kingpin” of a child sex ring that abused both Feldman and Haim when they were children.

So why not name names? “I would love to name names,” Feldman contends. “I’d love to be the first to do it. But unfortunately California — conveniently enough — has a statute of limitations that prevents that from happening.”

Last year, California removed its 10-year statute of limitations for sex crimes. The impetus behind the passage of the Justice for Victims Act was the alleged serial depredations of Bill Cosby and the reality that only one out of his 50 victims was still able to pursue prosecution.

Critics of the change insisted allowing more time for prosecution increases the odds innocent people will be adversely affected. “Human memory is fleeting, nobody’s memory gets better with time, eye-witness testimony is unreliable, alibis can become impossible to prove, records are thrown away, witnesses may move or die,” stated criminal defense attorney Troy W. Slaten. “All it takes is an accusation, [and] anyone can accuse anyone of anything.”

Slaten has a point, but Winters counters: “There’s nothing more terrifying to someone who is holding on to that history [of molestation] and that PTSD than to finally come forward and make those claims only to not be accepted.”

As for memory, Spacey’s is apparently fleeting. He claims he has no recollection of his encounter with Rapp but if it did happen, “I owe him the sincerest apology for what would have been deeply inappropriate drunken behavior, and I am sorry for the feelings he describes having carried with him all these years.”

Two other accusers have stepped forward, and Spacey himself reveals there may be others. And in a transparent attempt at deflection, Spacey announced he has chosen “to live as a gay man.”

The LGBT community isn’t buying the sleight of hand. “It is deeply sad and troubling that this is how Kevin Spacey has chosen to come out,” stated fellow “out” actor Zachary Quinto, who further characterized the move as “a calculated manipulation.” Writer Broderick Greer agreed, asserting, “Deeply, deeply unwise framing of this Kevin Spacey story, especially as it relates to the conflation of sexual orientation and sexual assault.”

If the shoe fits…

Yet why shouldn’t Spacey attempt to deflect, given the despicable nature of the sewer he and his fellow celebrities inhabit? The sewer where convicted child abuser Brian Peck continues to work “on projects geared toward children, including a popular Disney Channel series,” The Washington Times reports.

He isn’t alone. Director and screenwriter Victor Salva continues to work in the industry as well, despite a 1988 conviction for having sex with a 12-year-old boy whom he had cast in one of his movies.

Why wouldn’t accused molester Spacey expect similar dispensation?

“We haven’t heard anything from Hollywood, the big studios, about reforms to protect children,” stated Gabe Hoffman, co-producer of “An Open Secret,” a 2015 documentary that addresses Hollywood pedophilia. “At one point, shouldn’t we be asking, ‘What are these guys doing about it?’”

Despite a $1 million budget and direction by Oscar-nominated Amy Berg, the film struggled to find a distributor. Moreover, three film festivals in London, Toronto and Los Angeles reneged on initial agreements to screen it.

Unfortunately for the pedophiles, it is now available on Vimeo free of charge, and it has acquired more than two million views.

Feldman’s wife, Courtney Anne Mitchell, has created an Indiegogo site aimed at raising $10 million for a documentary on the subject, and Feldman claims he will name at least six people involved. He asserts the funds are needed to pay for litigation and security necessitated by the revelations.

Is Feldman credible? That remains to be seen, but he shouldn’t be going it alone. Former child actor Elijah Wood has insisted Tinseltown is rife with “organized” child abuse. “Westworld” actress Evan Rachel Wood agrees. “This will be the next dam to break,” she tweeted.

It will be a dam broken by the public’s “disgust with those in power who know and do nothing, who knew and still deny knowing,” asserts columnist Maureen Callahan.

In addition to the public, a “deeply troubled” Media Rights Capital and Netflix have indefinitely suspended production of Spacey’s show, “House of Cards.”

American leftists have justified much of their agenda as something they were doing “for the children.” Hollywood vipers have been doing it to the children, yet many of those same leftists have abided the monsters in their midst.

Does it get more “deplorable” than that?

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