Fellow Patriot: The voluntary financial generosity of supporters like you keeps our hard-hitting analysis coming. Please support the 2022 Year-End Campaign today. Thank you for your support! —Nate Jackson, Managing Editor

Douglas Andrews / November 10, 2022

Joe Biden’s ‘Good Day for Democracy’

In a rare press conference, the divider-in-chief gloated about his party not having lost too badly.

“Nothing.” Zip, zilch, nada.

That was Joe Biden’s response yesterday when asked during a rare press conference what he planned to do differently during the final two years of his one and only term. If Biden’s response doesn’t already seem arrogant enough, consider the exact question that was asked: “Seventy-five percent of people say the country is heading in the wrong direction. What do you intend to do differently?”

“Nothing”? Really?

Biden then explained: “Because they’re just finding out what we’re doing. The more they know about what we’re doing, the more support there is.”

That can’t be so — not unless soaring inflation, a looming recession, a surge in violent crime, a wide-open southern border, a failing educational system, a war on American energy, and a weaker military are more popular than we’d thought. Nevertheless, by doubling down on his ruinous policies, Biden reaffirms H.L. Mencken’s well-worn quip about democracy being the belief that the people know what they want, and that they deserve to get it good and hard.

Asked specifically about the midterm elections, whose votes are still, maddeningly, being counted in close races across the land, Biden said: “We’ve lost very few seats for certain. It was a good day for democracy.”

He continued: “While the press and pundits were predicting a giant red wave, it didn’t happen. I felt good during the whole process. While any seat lost is painful, we lost fewer seats in the House of Representatives than any president’s first term in last 40 years.”

He’s right about that, but mostly because the continual gerrymandering of congressional districts by both political parties has left fewer and fewer seats up for grabs. On top of that, the Republicans were starting from a high floor in the House to begin with — meaning that they were already just five seats from being in the majority — so the wild predictions of a 30- to 40-seat bloodbath were, in retrospect, idiotic. (Here, we’ll admit to being swept up in the moment, and we’ll vow to be better going forward.)

As for yesterday being “a good day for democracy,” Biden clearly meant “a bad day for Republicans,” who couldn’t seem to convince enough voters that myriad other issues were a graver threat to their way of life than overturning Roe v. Wade’s incorrectly adjudicated federal guarantee of abortion on demand.

But November 8 might not end up having been such a bad day for Republicans, except in terms of poorly managed expectations. How so? In Nevada, Adam Laxalt is hanging on to a narrow 1.8% lead with 83% of the votes counted in his bid to unseat incumbent Senator Catherine Cortez Masto. If Laxalt wins, control of the Senate will come down to a December 6 runoff in Georgia between Republican Herschel Walker and Democrat incumbent Raphael Warnock.

Thus, the Republican hopes of wresting control of both houses of Congress aren’t yet dead — far from it. Under-promise and over-deliver, as they say — not the other way around.

The other blessing that Republicans might draw from Tuesday’s middling results is a slightly strengthened Joe Biden, who didn’t lose as badly as was expected. We say this because it might make him even harder to usher off the stage between now and 2024.

Unlike just about everyone else on both sides of the aisle, Biden hasn’t ruled out a potential 2024 reelection bid. We can dream, of course. We can root for him to run because we don’t see how an octogenarian whose approval rating is stubbornly stuck in the low-40s can possibly win reelection.

Then again, we didn’t see how nearly three million Pennsylvanians could vote to send John Fetterman to the U.S. Senate, so we should probably shut our lousy soup cooler.

Start a conversation using these share links:

Who We Are

The Patriot Post is a highly acclaimed weekday digest of news analysis, policy and opinion written from the heartland — as opposed to the MSM’s ubiquitous Beltway echo chambers — for grassroots leaders nationwide. More

What We Offer

On the Web

We provide solid conservative perspective on the most important issues, including analysis, opinion columns, headline summaries, memes, cartoons and much more.

Via Email

Choose our full-length Digest or our quick-reading Snapshot for a summary of important news. We also offer Cartoons & Memes on Monday and Alexander’s column on Wednesday.

Our Mission

The Patriot Post is steadfast in our mission to extend the endowment of Liberty to the next generation by advocating for individual rights and responsibilities, supporting the restoration of constitutional limits on government and the judiciary, and promoting free enterprise, national defense and traditional American values. We are a rock-solid conservative touchstone for the expanding ranks of grassroots Americans Patriots from all walks of life. Our mission and operation budgets are not financed by any political or special interest groups, and to protect our editorial integrity, we accept no advertising. We are sustained solely by you. Please support The Patriot Fund today!

★ PUBLIUS ★

“Our cause is noble; it is the cause of mankind!” —George Washington

The Patriot Post is protected speech, as enumerated in the First Amendment and enforced by the Second Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America, in accordance with the endowed and unalienable Rights of All Mankind.

Copyright © 2022 The Patriot Post. All Rights Reserved.

The Patriot Post does not support Internet Explorer. We recommend installing the latest version of Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox, or Google Chrome.