National Days of Recognition

Martin Luther King Jr.


"I have a dream that one day … the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning, 'My country ‘tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, Land of the Pilgrims’ pride, From every mountainside, Let freedom ring.' When we let freedom ring … we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children — black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics — will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, 'Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, We are free at last!'" —“I Have a Dream," Martin Luther King Jr. (1963)

In 1983, Republican President Ronald Reagan signed into law a bill designating the 3rd Monday in January a national holiday honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who was born on 15 January 1929.

King, like his father and grandfather before him, was a Baptist minister. He was pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, and Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Despite the fact the Democratic Party claims Martin King's legacy, and asserts they are the sole protectors of his "dream," they have turned this iconic sovereign's message upside down, as if King had said, "I have a dream that my children will one day be judged by the color of their skin, not the content of their character." They've turned his dream into a mare, and their failed statist "Great Society" programs have effectively enslaved generations of poor, mostly black Americans on Democrat-controlled urban poverty plantations.

But poor blacks have been a staple Democrat Party constituency, having been inculcated with the belief that they are perpetual "victims of injustice" who must depend on their Democrat masters to take care of them.

Of course, racial injustice is real, though just a shadow of what it was 50 years ago. In King's 1966 assessment of racial violence in Barack Obama's hometown of Chicago, he declared: "This is the most tragic picture of man's inhumanity to man. I've been to Mississippi and Alabama and I can tell you that the hatred and hostility in Chicago are really deeper than in Alabama and Mississippi." King added, "Those who are associated with 'Black Power' and black supremacy are wrong." Racism was not and is not just a "Deep South" problem.

In 2009, Obama was heralded as the savior of black America, promising to take them from suppression to black supremacy. But Obama, was himself a disciple of the Afrocentric and anti-Semitic hated spewed by "Reverend" Jeremiah Wright and other Marxist mentors promoting black supremacy. But at the end of his eight years in office in 2017, Obama proved to be nothing more than a race-bait political hustler, who delivered only more suppression and dependence. Fact is, these charlatans have proven time and again that black lives don't matter — other than their votes.

In 1901, King's most notable predecessor in the fight for civil rights, Booker T. Washington, founder of the Tuskegee Institute, wrote in his seminal work, "Up From Slavery": "[I] resolved that I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him. … I pity from the bottom of my heart any individual who is so unfortunate as to get into the habit of holding race prejudice. … In the sight of God there is no color line, and we want to cultivate a spirit that will make us forget that there is such a line anyway."

He added, “Great men cultivate love. … Only little men cherish a spirit of hatred.”

Washington was a critic of those who made a practice of fomenting racial division. In his 1911 book, My Larger Education, Washington wrote racial agitators words that are even more applicable to their present-day brethren: “There is [a] class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. … Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs — partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays.”

Washington continued: “Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs. … There is a certain class of race-problem solvers who do not want the patient to get well, because as long as the disease holds out they have not only an easy means of making a living, but also an easy medium through which to make themselves prominent before the public.”

And that sums up today's Democrat Party haters, those who want the patient to remain ill in perpetuity. Democrats have turned King's dream into a nightmare.

But there is new hope for the poor black Americans MLK wanted to lift up. In fact, there is new hope for Americans from all walks of life — from somebody who Democrats, their Leftmedia propagandists and their supporting cast of race-bait profiteers deride daily: Donald Trump. Black Americans are among the major beneficiaries of the Trump/GOP's economic policies. Household income among blacks is increasing, while unemployment is at a record low. The Trump administration's economic policies have proven to be the rising tide which, in the words of John F. Kennedy, has "lifted all boats."

We believe that MLK would have recognized and acknowledged this good -- but today's Democrat Party is all-consumed with its message of fear and hate.

In proper historical context, King's message was one based on eternal Christian principles of love.

In 1964, King was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace. In his acceptance remarks, King acknowledged "the profound recognition that nonviolence is the answer to the crucial political and moral question of our time -- the need for man to overcome oppression and violence WITHOUT resorting to violence and oppression.”

On July 4th, 1965, preaching at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, MLK declared, "Love is the only absolute. ... I’ve seen too much hate to want to hate myself; hate is too great a burden to bear. ... Hate does something to the soul that causes one to lose his objectivity. The man who hates can’t think straight; the man who hates can’t reason right; the man who hates can’t see right; the man who hates can’t walk right. And I know now that Jesus is right, that love is the way."

One of the most outspoken detractors of the Left’s orthodoxy is King’s niece, Alveda. She was 17 at the time of her uncle’s assassination, and she recently recalled a conversation with her father, King's younger brother Alfred, on the day MLK died. Alveda told him, “I hate white people, they killed Uncle M.L.”

Her father, also a pastor and civil rights leader, replied, “No, white people didn’t kill my brother; white people didn’t kill your uncle. White people march with us, pray with us, go to jail with us, live with us, die with us. No, no, the devil did this. You have to forgive; you have to forgive.”

Such forgiveness is anathema to most of today’s Democrat leaders -- and the black community leaders in their stable.

Alveda added, “Acts 17:26 says, ‘Of one blood God made all people, to live together on the face of the earth.’ So we can be brothers and sisters because we are one blood; we are the human race. And I believe if my uncle were here today, he’d like for us to consider ourselves as human beings, not different races. One race, colorblind.”

We should all remember that Liberty is colorblind.

Regardless of one's conclusion about King's proper place in history, we encourage you to read his letter from a Birmingham jail, which provides a window into the soul of King's vision for all Americans.

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